Linoleic Acid

Linoleic Acid

RATING: EXCELLENT

  • CAS #: 60-33-3
  • INCI name: LINOLEIC ACID

Quick Facts

  • Also known as LA, omega-6 fatty acids, form of vitamin F
  • Famous omega-6 fatty acid and is found in abundant on the outer layer of the skin
  • Plays a vital role in the function and structure of the skin barrier
  • Those who have a linoleic acid deficiency will suffer more from scarring and pigmentation left behind from post-breakouts
  • Highly multi-functioning ingredient and provides many skin benefits

Who can use it?

All skin types, from dry, normal, oily and acne-prone can benefit from Linoleic acid being introduced into their skincare routine.

What is Linoleic acid?

Linoleic acid, also known as LA, is one of the immensely popular omega-6 fatty acid and natural occurring in the skin. You can expect to find large levels of this fatty acid outer layer of the skin, called the epidermis and performs the important task of preserving the structure of the skin and promoting ceramides enabling the skin’s protective barrier to function correctly. When topically applied to any skin type, dry or blemish-prone skin types will benefit from the repairing properties of linoleic acid not to mention its ability to reduce any hyperpigmentation by blocking melanin that develops in the lower layers of the skin as a result of sun exposure and other free radical damage. Dark spots and acne scarring will become less visible to the naked eye and the skin’s barrier remains rejuvenated and repaired.

Side effects of Linoleic acid

There are no known side effects of Linoleic acid when applied to the skin, you’ll find your skin will be looking its best. However if you find there are some irritation or reactions occurring you should stop using the product immediately.

Scientific Evidence

  • McCusker, Meagen M., and Jane M. Grant-Kels. "Healing fats of the skin: the structural and immunologic roles of the ω-6 and ω-3 fatty acids." Clinics in Dermatology 28.4 (2010): 440-451.
  • Prottey, C., et al. "The repair of impaired epidermal barrier function in rats by the cutaneous application of linoleic acid." British Journal of Dermatology 94.1 (1976): 13-21.
  • Downing, Donald T., et al. "Essential fatty acids and acne." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 14.2 (1986): 221-225.
  • Letawe, C., M. Boone, and G. E. Pierard. "Digital image analysis of the effect of topically applied linoleic acid on acne microcomedones." Clinical and experimental dermatology 23.2 (1998): 56-58.
  • Elias, Peter M., Barbara E. Brown, and Vincent A. Ziboh. "The permeability barrier in essential fatty acid deficiency: evidence for a direct role for linoleic acid in barrier function." Journal of Investigative Dermatology 74.4 (1980): 230-233.
  • Ando, Hideya, et al. "Linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid lightens ultraviolet-induced hyperpigmentation of the skin." Archives of dermatological research 290.7 (1998): 375-381.

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