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The Complete FAQ Guide To Natural Deodorants

What ingredients in natural deodorants do I want?
What ingredients should I avoid in deodorants?
Are natural deodorants safe?
How can you reduce sweating?
What causes deodorant stains?
How do you get rid of deodorant stains?
Does deodorant or antiperspirant cause breast cancer?
What is the difference between deodorant and antiperspirant?
Is baking soda a good deodorant?
How do you detox your armpits?
What makes a deodorant vegan?
What is aluminium chlorohydrate in deodorant?
Can you use coconut oil as a natural deodorant?
What essential oils are good for deodorant?
Is apple cider vinegar good as a deodorant?
Can you use aloe vera as deodorant?

What ingredients in natural deodorants do I want?

There are many different ingredients you may want to look out in natural deodorants. Ours, for example, contains activated charcoal, which is one of the worlds most powerful absorbing ingredients. In fact, it is so powerful at extracting toxins that it is used by ambulances to extract poison from people’s stomach’s if they have swallowed something, or to remove poison from a snake bite.

Some other ingredients you may want to look out for include witch hazel, which is a great non-alcohol ingredient, helping to reduce the size of the pores in the armpit. As it is derived from the bark and leaves of a shrub, it is a great vegan ingredient.

Many fragrances contains some nasty hidden ingredients you may not know you are adding to your skin, therefore opting for essential oils can be a great solution. From lavender to tea tree, there are plenty of great options to choose from.

Many homemade deodorants also use baking soda, as it is incredible at tackling body odour. It has also been shown to work instantly the moment it makes impact with the odour causing molecules.

 

 

What ingredients should I avoid in deodorants?

The main ingredient that people try to avoid when opting for a natural deodorant is aluminium, due to the connection between the chemical and potentially causing breast cancer or alzheimer’s disease, which is all covered further in this article below.

Beyond aluminium, parabens are another big no-no, due to their ability to affect hormones and increase the production of oestrogen, which again can be a factor in breast cancer.

There are a few antibacterial agents which can be included, yet they are culpable of damaging the immune function and disrupting the endocrine system.

You should also look out for formaldehyde, phthalates and propylene glycol as ingredients to avoid.

 

Are natural deodorants safe?

All of our products go through a vigorous testing process and are shown positively in all results. Natural deodorants largely use ingredients such as coconut oil and arrowroot, therefore unless you are highly allergic to anything of this nature you should be absolutely fine.

 

How can you reduce sweating?

The main way is by adding an antiperspirant, which will block the sweat ducts and soak up all moisture on the underarms. You can also avoid sweating by wearing lightweight clothes, especially in warmer weather or if performing exercise.

You may also be consuming certain foods and drinks that can increase perspiration. If you are tucking into a hot curry, you may find yourself sweating quite a bit.

 

What causes deodorant stains?

We are proud to say our natural deodorant does not cause any form of stain on the clothes, however this can’t be said about all products. So what causes this nasty stain?

The most common reason for those yellow pit stains is actually the ingredient we remove from our products, the aluminium in antiperspirants. This is actually a reaction when combining the aluminium with sweat. So if you suffer from yellow stains under the arms, by opting for a non-aluminium based product you are likely to see an improvement.

 

How do you get rid of deodorant stains?

If the stain is already on there, try to give it a rinse with some cold water. DO NOT use a stain remover, as ironically this can make the stain permanent as it can cause a reaction with the ingredients of the stain remover and the aluminium, making it cling to your clothing.

Persil actually recommends combining water with lemon juice and then applying this to the stain, leaving it in the sun, before rinsing the garment.

 

Does deodorant or antiperspirant cause breast cancer?

While research has been limited to date, at the moment there is no direct connection between aluminium in antiperspirants and an increased risk of breast cancer.

The general view is that you should try to limit exposure to any chemical, however this has been amplified in the media around aluminium, due to several reasons which should certainly be taken into account. Firstly, studies have shown that human breast epithelial cells can turn into a cancerous phenotype following exposure to aluminium chloride. The aluminium chloride and chlorohydrate also help the tumour to spread as they increase the capability of motion.

The second factor is that aluminium can interfere with oestrogen action and potentially stimulate the production of natural oestrogen. Multiple studies have proven that an increased exposure to oestrogen will create a significant risk factor for breast cancer, therefore the connection is definitely viable.

Most breast cancers start in the upper outer quadrant, which is why underarm cosmetics are so closely connected to breast cancer, as the chemical could be absorbed following cutting from shaving the armpit, or general absorption into the skin.

The reality is there is a desperate requirement for further studies to be taken, so an undeniable answer can be offered.

 

What is the difference between deodorant and antiperspirant?

While these terms are often clumped together, especially as most products contain both nowadays, they are actually very different. Deodorants neutralise any smell that sweat creates, which is great if you want to walk out smelling beautifully, but it doesn’t prevent more sweat from being created. This is where antiperspirant steps up, as it clogs and block the pores, meaning they will prevent the release of sweat through the glands, as well as dissolving any moisture currently under the arms.

To summarise, deodorant kills bacteria on the skin and helps with odour prevention, while antiperspirants prevent sweating.

 

Is baking soda a good deodorant?

As people increasingly opt for natural deodorants, the options continue to increase and diversify. One option available to you is baking soda, which can easily be created at home. You mix a small amount of baking soda with some water and simply rub it onto the underarms. Some people also like to mix the baking soda with corn-starch for optimal results.

 

How do you detox your armpits?

Before we go into the how, let’s start with the why. Your underarms are constantly exposed to toxins and, just like your liver or kidney, they need to release toxins, which can be difficult if you’ve previously been regularly using an aluminium based deodorant. Therefore, for people switching to a natural deodorant, it can be worth detoxing the armpits beforehand for optimal results. It should be stated that switching to a natural deodorant is a huge part of detoxing the armpits, but you may benefit from one step beforehand, which I’ll highlight below:

The most popular form of armpit detoxing involves a mask, often involving ingredients such as apple cider vinegar and coconut oil, as well as clays. The mask is left on the underarm for around 10-20 minutes and then washed clean off.

We do generally warn about using apple cider vinegar, as it can cause irritation or burning, so be careful if you do decide to do this.

We should also highlight that actually a normal wash with water and soap will arguably get just as good results.

 

What makes a deodorant vegan?

Turn back 10 years and it was incredibly hard to find a vegan deodorant, however nowadays you’re almost spoilt for choice.

You need to avoid certain ingredients, however it can be hard to spot, due to the fact they use the scientific names. Allantoin is one, as it comes from uric acid of an animal, more often than not from cows. Another to avoid is lanolin, which is the greasy emulsifying byproduct of the wool industry, regularly found in cosmetics. Derived from sheep’s wool, the issue with spotting lanolin in the ingredients is it sometimes comes under titles.

Another ingredient you will find in a number of deodorant balms is beeswax, as it helps to keep the ingredients together and is becoming more commonplace due to its low prices.

Elastin, usually derived from cows, is another ingredient that can regularly pop up in cosmetics.

None of the Procoal products are tested on animals and we are proud to not use animal derived ingredients.

 

What is aluminium chlorohydrate in deodorant?

These FDA recognised aluminium based salts are one of the main ingredients in traditional antiperspirants, which as previously mentioned are not used in many natural deodorants. It works in blocking the sweat ducts, reducing and preventing perspiration, to great effect, however it’s reputation has been tarnished by the constant highlight of its potential effect on breast cancer.

 

Can you use coconut oil as a natural deodorant?

The love for coconut oil continues to grow over time, as the industry keeps booming, while the next area appears to be natural deodorants or homemade versions. Containing a mild level of antibacterial properties, the hope is that they can prevent the bacteria growing under the armpit which leads to bad odour. The argument however is whether it can work on staphyloccus hominis, which is the guilty suspect causing you all those issues with body odour, while the research hasn’t been produced far enough to show evidence in either direction.

If making a homemade version, make sure to add arrowroot powder to help absorb any moisture on the armpits, as well as an essential oil to fragrance the underarms in a more natural way.

 

What essential oils are good for deodorant?

You have quite a wide selection to pick from, with some of the best and most effective including lemongrass, rosemary, tea tree, lavender, peppermint, lemon, bergamot, palmarosa, eucalyptus, geranium, clary sage, cypress, ginger and grapefruit.

Picking the right one for you might take some experimentation as you learn what fragrance each offers, the antibacterial breakdown and how your body reacts to each.

 

Is apple cider vinegar good as a deodorant?

As we mentioned previously, you can use apple cider vinegar in an armpit detoxification. Having said that, many suffer from either irritation or burning, so use with caution as people react differently to the application on their underarms.

Apple cider vinegar has an acidic PH level of 4.5, which is quite close to your actual skin level of 5.5, meaning if used as a deodorant, it can help to reduce the growth of odour causing bacteria. Many have offered glowing reports, but just like the armpit detox, we do offer a word of caution as manuy also report dryness and a negative reaction.

 

Can you use aloe vera as deodorant?

This is a common ingredient in homemade deodorants, as it will help to reduce body odour yet works well with people who are sensitive. Considering we just discussed the effects apple cider vinegar or baking soda can have on some people, aloe vera is certainly a more soothing option. It has many antibacterial and antimicrobial properties, so you will find it in many natural alternative options.

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